4 Actionable Tips for Engaging Teams in Positive Habit Formation

It’s understandable if you’re not feeling 100% like yourself in 2020. Neither are your employees. In times of upheaval, the “soft” skills we use at work—focus, patience, creativity, attention to detail—can all suffer.

How can we regain our sense of stability?

Designing a Wellness Program for Multigenerational Workplaces

Editor's Note: We recently updated this previously published post with new insights. Enjoy!

The generational makeup of the workforce is changing rapidly: for the first time in history, four generations of employees are represented in the workplace. Millennials have surpassed both boomers and Gen X to make up the largest portion (40%), while the first wave of Generation Zers, composed of people in their early 20s, are just entering the workforce.

Why Learning Labs Plus Practice Is the Key to Driving Positive Behavior Change

Adult life is busy. There’s work with its competing demands and deadlines, the many chores involved with managing a home and raising a family, social obligations, personal time for exercise, and once in a while, a little bit of relaxation.

That doesn’t leave much time for learning and developing new skills. Fortunately, “not much time” may be all that’s needed.

How to Help Your Employees Improve the Ergonomics of Their Home Workspaces

As the coronavirus began to spread around the country at the beginning of this year, America’s white-collar workers migrated en masse from their cubicles, offices, and conference rooms to their living rooms, dens, and kitchens. Card tables and folding chairs replaced ergonomic office chairs and desks. Smaller laptop screens took the place of multi-monitor setups.

And many of us are still there, working from our improvised home workspaces.

5 Reasons to Include Emotional Wellness in Employee Wellness Programs

Eating better, working out, getting more sleep … taking care of our physical self is relatively straightforward (even if it’s often easier said than done).

Achieving good emotional health may be a bit more complicated—but it’s just as important as achieving good physical health. And yet, emotional wellness often lands squarely on the back burner, particularly in the workplace. Why isn't emotional health more of a priority for overall employee wellness?

Are Open Offices Helping or Harming Workplace Wellness?

The CEO of the agency welcomes you on your first day and leads you to your workspace. It’s decked out with top-line equipment: a brand-new Mac, an Aeron chair, and a glossy-white desk.

The only thing your new office is missing? Walls.

Holistic Wellness: What It Is and How to Promote It

Wellness is more than a single blood pressure reading or the number of miles we logged last week on our Fitbit. Instead, wellness is a complex connection of systems, with each one affecting the next.

Because of this, companies who take a siloed approach to employee wellness, focusing solely on nutrition or fitness, do themselves—and their employees—a huge disservice.

But imagine what could be accomplished when an employer helps their employees not just eat well and better manage health conditions, but also plan for retirement or college, teach stress management and coping strategies, and develop social groups to keep employees feeling connected.

How Management and Wellness Programs Can Prevent Burnout

It’s that Sunday-evening feeling of sickening dread. It’s knowing that no matter what you do at work, it’ll never be enough. It’s taking a day off, only to end up fielding work calls and emails all day long.

“Burned out,” like “depressed,” is a term that is often casually thrown around. And like depression, trueburnout—a state of chronic stress that leads to physical and emotional exhaustion—can be surprisingly common and completely debilitating.

Tackling Employee Burnout: Q&A with IU Health Physicians

Imagine being in a high-pressure profession in which you’re encouraged to put other people’s well-being above your own, are required to have a near-perfect success rate, and any mistakes you make could literally kill someone. And if the stress gets to be too much, you’re expected to push it aside and get on with your day.

This experience is the reality for many physicians.

Wellness and Role Models: What’s the Link?

There’s a commonly held belief that married couples often end up resembling each other as they age. As it turns out, this may be true. Researchers who have studied married couples report spouses’ similar facial features are due to the decades of emotions they’ve shared.

But facial features aren’t the only things we share with those we are close to.

We often take on the attitudes, behaviors, and emotions of the people we surround ourselves with in both our personal and professional lives—and this can have a profound effect on our health and wellness.