Designing a Wellness Program for Multigenerational Workplaces

Editor's Note: We recently updated this previously published post with new insights. Enjoy!

The generational makeup of the workforce is changing rapidly: for the first time in history, four generations of employees are represented in the workplace. Millennials have surpassed both boomers and Gen X to make up the largest portion (40%), while the first wave of Generation Zers, composed of people in their early 20s, are just entering the workforce.

Is a Plant-Based Diet the Way to Wellness?

Meat has been a staple of the human diet for as long as there have been humans. But do we really need meat? Can fruits, vegetables, beans, and other food that grows out of the soil provide all the nutrients and energy we need to survive and even thrive?

A growing body of evidence suggests that shifting to a plant-based diet can result in major benefits to your health–and the environment.

Contemplating that shift, however, can raise a lot of questions.

9 Proven Ways to Keep Remote Workers Healthy and Engaged

Remote work was already on the rise. In 2015, 3.9 million U.S. workers were working remotely. By 2019, that number had grown to 4.7 million. 

In the past few weeks, however, that number has exploded. To support social distancing during the current spread of the COVID-19 virus, more and more companies have asked (or ordered) employees to work from home.

Should Dry January Be One of Your Wellness Program Challenges?

Alcohol is a ubiquitous part of our culture. Socializing with colleagues after work, the office holiday party, unwinding after an exhausting day—all of these occasions often revolve around drinking and can be awkward for people who don’t partake.

Until recently, that is.

5 Wellness Benefits of Gratitude

Thanksgiving and health tend to not go hand in hand: The average American consumed 3,000 calories during their big family dinner.

Despite this, there are health benefits that come with the holiday. (And no, we’re not talking about the meager amount of veggies you get from eating Aunt Sue’s green-bean casserole.)

The act of giving thanks is good for our physical and mental health. Gratitude is a habit worth cultivating and practicing not just around Thanksgiving, but all year round.

Here is what the science says about the transformative power of gratitude:

Should Integrative Medicine Be Part of Your Employee Wellness Program?

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but what about a good massage? Or maybe some herbal tea? Or perhaps some meditation?

Conventional medicine has long been the dominant source for treatment and advice when it comes to keeping us healthy. In recent decades, however, there is an increased interest in expanding our ideas of healthcare and what it really takes to be well. As a result, people are beginning to integrate other approaches and techniques into their lifestyle.

Read on to learn what integrative medicine is and whether you should make it a part of your employee wellness program.

How to Create an Ecosystem of Engaged Employees and Happy Hikers

Note: This is a special-edition article from WellRight's Vice President of Marketing, Lynn Zimmerman.

Greetings from Camp Denali, located in the heart of Alaska at the literal end of the road in Denali National Park. This is where I spent a week of my summer vacation, and it was amazing; I didn’t want to leave. As we were planning our Alaskan holiday, I have to admit that sleeping in a cabin without electricity and running water was a bit daunting to imagine, but the service, gourmet plated meals, knowledgeable hiking guides, and especially the sense of community made it well worth the slight inconveniences. In fact, I began to enjoy the morning fires to heat up the cabin and the walks to the lodge for a hot cup of tea in the late afternoon.

Lactation Room Requirements and Other Breastfeeding Laws You Need to Know

After the all-too-short weeks home with your new baby, it’s time to go back to work. You head back into the office, say hello to everybody, and check in with your boss to get up to speed. During the conversation, you mention needing a private place to pump milk for your baby, only to hear, “Just go ahead and use the washrooms, nobody will mind.”

At this point, you do a direct stare into the camera like Jim from The Office.

What Is Nature-Deficit Disorder, and How Can Employers Help?

The wind whips through your hair as you deploy your parachute. You gaze down at the mountains, the forest, and at the crystal-blue water lapping the beaches. Then … Mom calls you to dinner and you put down your game controller.

Many of us grew up all but living outdoors—riding our bikes to and from friends’ houses and playing outside until the sun went down (and then coming inside only to grab flashlights and head back out for more).

But over the years, something has changed.

Marijuana and Health: What Employers Need to Know

Quick: Think of the traditional stereotype of a typical marijuana user. Popular culture has long depicted people who smoke cannabis as rebellious teenagers (or shiftless adults living in mom’s basement).

That public image, however, is quickly shifting. As marijuana becomes increasingly legalized and socially accepted, soccer moms and CEOs are perusing different strains at sleek, Apple Store-like dispensaries, while politicians’ talk of former marijuana use elicits nothing but shrugs. (We’ve come a long way from “I didn’t inhale.”)

Your employees may also be partaking, for a variety of health-related reasons.