Should Integrative Medicine Be Part of Your Employee Wellness Program?

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but what about a good massage? Or maybe some herbal tea? Or perhaps some meditation?

Conventional medicine has long been the dominant source for treatment and advice when it comes to keeping us healthy. In recent decades, however, there is an increased interest in expanding our ideas of healthcare and what it really takes to be well. As a result, people are beginning to integrate other approaches and techniques into their lifestyle.

Read on to learn what integrative medicine is and whether you should make it a part of your employee wellness program.

How to Create an Ecosystem of Engaged Employees and Happy Hikers

Note: This is a special-edition article from WellRight's Vice President of Marketing, Lynn Zimmerman.

Greetings from Camp Denali, located in the heart of Alaska at the literal end of the road in Denali National Park. This is where I spent a week of my summer vacation, and it was amazing; I didn’t want to leave. As we were planning our Alaskan holiday, I have to admit that sleeping in a cabin without electricity and running water was a bit daunting to imagine, but the service, gourmet plated meals, knowledgeable hiking guides, and especially the sense of community made it well worth the slight inconveniences. In fact, I began to enjoy the morning fires to heat up the cabin and the walks to the lodge for a hot cup of tea in the late afternoon.

Lactation Room Requirements and Other Breastfeeding Laws You Need to Know

After the all-too-short weeks home with your new baby, it’s time to go back to work. You head back into the office, say hello to everybody, and check in with your boss to get up to speed. During the conversation, you mention needing a private place to pump milk for your baby, only to hear, “Just go ahead and use the washrooms, nobody will mind.”

At this point, you do a direct stare into the camera like Jim from The Office.

What Is Nature-Deficit Disorder, and How Can Employers Help?

The wind whips through your hair as you deploy your parachute. You gaze down at the mountains, the forest, and at the crystal-blue water lapping the beaches. Then … Mom calls you to dinner and you put down your game controller.

Many of us grew up all but living outdoors—riding our bikes to and from friends’ houses and playing outside until the sun went down (and then coming inside only to grab flashlights and head back out for more).

But over the years, something has changed.

Marijuana and Health: What Employers Need to Know

Quick: Think of the traditional stereotype of a typical marijuana user. Popular culture has long depicted people who smoke cannabis as rebellious teenagers (or shiftless adults living in mom’s basement).

That public image, however, is quickly shifting. As marijuana becomes increasingly legalized and socially accepted, soccer moms and CEOs are perusing different strains at sleek, Apple Store-like dispensaries, while politicians’ talk of former marijuana use elicits nothing but shrugs. (We’ve come a long way from “I didn’t inhale.”)

Your employees may also be partaking, for a variety of health-related reasons.

Men’s Health Month and Your Wellness Program

Some people joke about the “man flu”—the idea that men tend to exaggerate their symptoms when they become sick. Recent research suggests there might be some legitimacy to this mythical ailment, however, with a true immunity gap existing between the sexes.

“Man flu” notwithstanding, men have an increased risk for many other serious, even potentially fatal, conditions. As we enter Men’s Health Month in June, it’s important to acknowledge five significant health risks men face and learn what employers can do to improve the health of this segment of the workforce.

4 Tips for Helping Reduce Stroke Risk in Employees

In the 90s, actor Luke Perry captured the hearts of millions when he played heartthrob Dylan McKay on TV’s 90210. In March 2019, he broke those same hearts when he suffered a massive stroke and passed away five days later.

Many wouldn’t consider Perry, just 52 years old at the time of his death, a high stroke risk. After all, it’s a condition usually associated with the elderly. But life-changing — and potentially fatal — strokes can happen to anyone, at any time. In fact, there’s evidence that suggests that stroke rates are increasing among young people — including young adults and children.

Wellness Program Considerations for Near-Retirement

Ahh…retirement. When we picture our future without an alarm clock, what does it look like? Maybe it looks like a beachfront condo or a camper on the open road. Maybe it looks like volunteering or picking up a new hobby.

However your employees envision their retirement, you want them to be as prepared as possible to enjoy it. But you know that designing a comfortable retirement isn’t as easy as it sounds. There are finances to plan, health issues to manage, days to fill.

Luckily, employees have you—and your wellness program—to help them prepare. Here’s what they should do … and how you can help.

New Year, Good Habits? Helping Employees Keep Their Wellness Resolutions

It’s cliche, but true: Gym memberships skyrocket in January, as resolution-makers swear this is the year they’ll get in shape.

And yet by May, nearly 80 percent of new gym members will have stopped going. And by the end of the year, fewer than 10 percent will have felt like they kept their resolution.

As an employer, can you help things be different this year?

5 Tips for Getting Employees on Board With Biometric Screening

The term “carrot and stick” comes from farmers dangling a carrot in front of animals to encourage them to make forward progress. But while farmers rarely let the hard-working animals get the carrot, today’s employers know better.

Instead, they understand that to encourage positive change—like participation in biometric screening—they need to offer the “carrots” employees can actually earn and enjoy.