3 Ways Positive Psychology Boosts Employee Empowerment and Mindset Change

"What does it mean to live a life worth living? Philosophers, artists, and everyday people have wrestled with this question for centuries, but only in the past few decades has the field of psychology taken it up,” shares Stella Grizont, positive psychology expert and speaker. 

Around the turn of the 21st century, Martin Seligman, at the time the president of the American Psychological Association, lamented the “exclusive focus on pathology” in his field and proposed an alternative approach he termed “positive psychology.”

According to Seligman and his collaborator Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, positive psychology is “the scientific study of positive human functioning and flourishing on multiple levels that include the biological, personal, relational, institutional, cultural, and global dimensions of life.”

If we think of traditional psychology as helping people overcome their mental health issues to improve their functioning, positive psychology aims at empowering people not just to achieve functionality, but to thrive.

The Role of Mindfulness in a Wellness Program

Even though many companies have temporarily closed their office doors and are operating with a remote workforce, work stress hasn’t disappeared. Indeed, it may have gotten worse. Back-to-back Zoom meetings, homeschooling, an overflowing email inbox, and working late nights once the kids go to bed can add up to frazzled employees trying to balance the demands of work and home.

Luckily, employers have access to a tool that has the power to help employees manage stress, increase productivity, and improve their overall sense of well-being, while lowering healthcare expenses and reducing absenteeism. Even better, it hardly costs a thing.

Magic? Nope. It’s mindfulness.

5 Reasons to Include Emotional Wellness in Employee Wellness Programs

Eating better, working out, getting more sleep … taking care of our physical self is relatively straightforward (even if it’s often easier said than done).

Achieving good emotional health may be a bit more complicated—but it’s just as important as achieving good physical health. And yet, emotional wellness often lands squarely on the back burner, particularly in the workplace. Why isn't emotional health more of a priority for overall employee wellness?

Helping Employees Strengthen Emotional Resilience

Stress is a fact of life. Whether it’s stress caused by personal issues, work demands, or global events, we all experience some form of negative stress in our lives. Indeed, about half of Americans report experiencing a “major stressful event” in the previous year. Fortunately, your workplace can be a surprisingly effective force for good when it comes to reducing your employees’ stress levels. Not only can you make sure your workplace isn’t unnecessarily stressful, but you can use your corporate wellness program to help employees bounce back faster and more fully when stress—from any source—does occur. 

How? By helping employees strengthen their emotional resilience.

Mental Health at Work: Insights from HR.com

Make no mistake; some of your employees struggle with mental illness at least some of the time. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that nearly one out of five adults experiences mental illness in a given year. Depression and anxiety cost the U.S. economy $1 trillion per year in lost productivity.

And your workplace itself may be a contributing factor. One in four Americans say work is a source of anxiety.

How should you address mental health issues at your workplace?

9 Proven Ways to Keep Remote Workers Healthy and Engaged

Remote work was already on the rise. In 2015, 3.9 million U.S. workers were working remotely. By 2019, that number had grown to 4.7 million. 

In the past few weeks, however, that number has exploded. To support social distancing during the current spread of the COVID-19 virus, more and more companies have asked (or ordered) employees to work from home.

How Burnout Affects Women

Health organizations are beginning to recognize burnout as a worldwide epidemic. By some estimates, burnout costs employers well over $100 billion every year and endangers the health of millions, striking without warning and affecting a majority of today’s workforce.

But some recent research suggests that women may burn out faster than men.

To reduce burnout rates at your workplace, it’s useful to understand the unique pressures women face at work and at home and how they can lead to burnout.

How to Make Stress Management a Top Wellness Priority

If you love your job, the old saying goes, you'll never have to work a day in your life. Unfortunately, like so many other bits of conventional wisdom, this one’s not entirely true.

No matter how satisfied your employees are with their jobs, sometimes work is going to feel like … well, work. In other words, it's going to be stressful.

When left unchecked, however, occasional stress can morph into chronic stress, which can negatively affect a person’s wellness in widespread and sometimes surprising ways.

Why Empathy Is Key to Emotional Wellness

People with a strong sense of empathy are more enjoyable to be around. Empathy makes someone more likely to help others, to show compassion, and to hold humane and reasonable expectations of others. On the other hand, a lack of empathy leads to situations like a boss crashing an employee’s chemotherapy appointment to ask about work-related matters.

We think about empathy primarily in terms of how we relate to other people. But is having empathy beneficial to yourself too? And how can organizations help nurture a sense of empathy among employees and management?

Is “Mindful Eating” Just Another Diet?

The Cabbage Soup Diet. Keto. The Zone. Atkins. Weight Watchers.

For anybody who has ever wished to lose weight, the choices and possibilities are endless—and often contradictory. Is fat bad, or is it the key to attaining a healthier size without feeling deprived? Are carbs evil or are they something that can be enjoyed in moderation?

Now, there is talk about "mindful eating." But what IS mindful eating? Is it a diet, or something different? And could it be the key to helping your employees make healthier food choices?